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Covid-19, the Corona Virus, news of the epidemic, infection, control and spread as we receive it at PHN.

Covid -19

Primary Health Net has decided to publish all data and information received on one page as we receive it.

As of most Opchat and PHN pages all are archived so we will be adding news stories to this page in the order received. There might be some duplication with our Opchat News but it will remain on this page to be referenced. Case numbers each day plus county variations are shown further down the page.



Further Updated Details from HMRC with links
Health Secretary sets out plan to carry out 100,000 coronavirus tests a day
Self-employment Income Support Scheme
Financial support for people and businesses
Routine Eyecare by Optical Practices ordered to cease on March 23rd in Scotland
Key Workers
New indemnity scheme for historical clinical negligence claims
New guidance to stay at home for 14 days if someone in your household has symptoms
What to do if you have symptoms?
Daily Government report on testing and loss of life

Further Updated Details from HMRC with links

April 2020

HMRC confirms that the employer guidance and guidance for employees have been further updated in line with some of the main queries we have received from stakeholders. Whilst all the guidance has been refreshed, the main areas I would draw your attention to are:
• the more detailed information on scheme eligibility
• further information on how to calculate a claim
• clarification of what constitutes wages.

HMRC encourages you to please review the links above if you would like more information about the scheme.

Health Secretary sets out plan to carry out 100,000 coronavirus tests a day


April 2nd

New 5-pillar plan outlines national effort to increase testing to 100,000 a day in England

England will carry out 100,000 tests for coronavirus every day by the end of this month, Health Secretary Matt Hancock pledged today.

Increased testing for the NHS will form part of a new 5-pillar plan, bringing together government, industry, academia, the NHS and many others, to dramatically increase the number of tests being carried out each day.

Professor John Newton the Director of Health Improvement for Public Health England, has been appointed to help deliver the new plans and bring together industry, universities, NHS and government behind the ambitious testing targets.

He will coordinate a national effort with global manufacturers encouraged to expand their manufacturing capacity here in England; our strongest, home grown businesses in life sciences and other industries are encouraged to turn their resources to creating and rolling out mass testing at scale, and the government will support anyone with a scalable scientific idea or innovation to start a business.

New testing capabilities for the NHS and their families will support staff who are isolating at home to return safely to work if the test is negative, and keep themselves and others safe if the test is positive.

Significant progress to increase testing has already taken place across the country to protect the vulnerable, support our NHS, and ultimately save lives. New testing centres have been established at the main hotspots of the disease, and the UK has already conducted more than 152,000 tests. The 5-pillar plan sets targets to expand the England’s capability further.

The new 5-pillar plan outlines the ambitions to:

Scale up swab testing in PHE labs and NHS hospitals for those with a medical need and the most critical workers to 25,000 a day by mid to late April;

Deliver increased commercial swab testing for critical key workers in the NHS, before then expanding to key workers in other sectors;

Develop blood testing to help know if people have the right antibodies and so have high levels of immunity to coronavirus;

Conduct surveillance testing to learn more about the spread of the disease and help develop new tests and treatments; and

Create a new National Effort for testing, to build a mass-testing capacity at a completely new scale.

Once widespread testing is available, we will prioritise repeated testing of critical key workers, to keep them safe and make sure that they do not spread the virus.

Over time, plans announced today will also see increasing focus on testing to see if people have already had the virus, to identify if they have the antibodies that will give them immunity against catching it again. This science is new and developing, but the aim is for a successful test that can be rolled out at scale, that could allow critical workers - and then the wider population - to return to work and their daily lives.

26.03.20

The Chancellor, on March 26th, announced a new Self-employment Income Support Scheme to support self-employed people who have been adversely affected by COVID-19.


GOV¯.UK has further details about who is eligible for the scheme and how it will work

Self-employed people do not need to get in touch with HMRC as the scheme isn’t yet open for applications. HMRC will contact eligible customers by the beginning of June, inviting them to apply.
Deferral of Self Assessment Income Tax payments due in July 2020 and VAT payments due from 20 March 2020 until 3¯0¯¯ June 2020

Financial support for people and businesses

20th March

The Chancellor, this evening, announced further measures to support people and businesses through this period of disruption caused by COVID-19.

The Chancellor’s statement can be found at GOV.UK.

Updated guidance for employers, businesses and employees is available at:


We will continue to share the most up to date information directly with you as it becomes available.

Routine Eyecare by Optical Practices ordered to cease on March 23rd in Scotland


Read the news story on Opchat News here

And read the Scottish Memo containing reparation costs and claiming instructions

Read full memo here


 

Key Workers

The government has defined key workers


As including, but not limited to, ‘doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers; the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector…’

Health and social care

This includes but is not limited to doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers; the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector; those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributers of medicines and medical and personal protective equipment.

Read the full key worker list here

The College of Optometrists are seeking clarity on this point. In the meantime, they believe that optometrists and staff that are required to maintain services fall within this definition, and their children should be allowed to attend school.


 

The government will increase number of people tested for COVID-19 to 25,000 hospital patients a day.

3:08pm, 18 March 2020

New Indemnity Scheme for clinical negligence

New indemnity scheme for historical clinical negligence claims in general practice introduced
Page summary
The Existing Liabilities Scheme for General Practice (ELSGP) will provide general practice staff with cover for historical NHS clinical negligence claims.

New indemnity scheme for historical clinical negligence claims in general practice introduced


17.03.20

New guidance to stay at home for 14 days

if someone in your household has symptoms of COVID-19 is the focus of the next stage of a public awareness campaign launched by Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock today.

The new guidance will set out that individuals will still be asked to self-isolate for 7 days from the onset of COVID-19 symptoms but any individuals in the household will now be asked to self-isolate for 14 days from that moment as well.

If other members of your household develop symptoms, however mild, at any time during the 14 days, they must not leave the home for 7 days from when symptoms started.

The new phase of the campaign will build on the existing TV, radio, online, digital and billboard adverts currently visible all over the country. These reinforce the importance of washing your hands more often and for 20 seconds, and ask people to self-isolate for 7 days if they develop a high temperature or a new continuous cough, however mild.

Government has taken the further measure of asking whole households to isolate because it is likely that people living with others will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community.

The Prime Minister also today set out a number of social distancing measures to reduce the risk of infection from the spread of coronavirus. For those who remain well, are under 70 or do not have an underlying health condition, they are advised to limit their social contact where possible, including using less public transport, working at home and considering not going to pubs, restaurants, theatres and bars.

For those who are over 70, have an underlying health condition or are pregnant, they are strongly advised against these activities and to significantly limit face-to-face interaction with friends and family if possible.

The government’s public awareness campaign offers clear, practical advice so people can play their part in preventing and slowing the spread of the virus.

The most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves remains washing their hands more often, for at least 20 seconds, with soap and water. Make sure you cough or sneeze into a tissue, put it in a bin and wash your hands.

The awareness campaign also reiterates the importance of seeking help online by visiting NHS.UK/coronavirus to check your symptoms and follow the medical advice, rather than visiting your GP.

It also urges people with any symptoms to avoid contact with older and more vulnerable people.

Only if symptoms become worse should people use the NHS 111 service. To ensure the phone service is readily available to those who need it, where possible people should use the 111 website rather than calling.

Earlier this month, the Prime Minister published a ‘battle plan’ for tackling the disease in the UK, which sets out plans for a range of scenarios. Last week, the Prime Minister confirmed the UK has moved into the second stage of this plan, the ‘delay’ phase.

Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock said:

Coronavirus is the biggest public health crisis we have faced in a generation, and we will do whatever is necessary to protect our elderly and most vulnerable people and keep the public safe.

This is an unprecedented situation and it’s so important for each of us to rally together and do our bit to protect ourselves and each other, as well as our NHS, from this disease.

Washing hands regularly for 20 seconds or more remains the single most important thing each of us can do, but we now also need to ask everyone in a household to stay at home if anyone in their home shows symptoms.

Combating this virus will require a huge national effort. We must do all we can to save lives, protect the NHS and keep the most vulnerable people in our society safe.


 The government has today published new and updated guidance to provide affected sectors

Partly superseded

Here is their latest advice on managing the threat from COVID-19. The Public Health England (PHE) guidance provides important information for specific sectors, including schools and transport, on what precautions to take, what to do if someone develops symptoms and how to limit the spread of the virus.
The guidance will assist staff, employers and members of the public after the government last week shifted into the ‘delay’ phase of its action plan to slow the spread of the virus, reduce pressures on the NHS and protect the most vulnerable.

New and updated COVID-19 industry guidance: Guidance has also been published on how to clean non-healthcare settings such as offices or hotel rooms where a person with possible or confirmed COVID-19 has spent time while experiencing symptoms.

The guidance recommends a range of measures for different industries, including:

using announcements in transport hubs to reinforce key messages, such as washing hands before and after travel, and what to do if unwell

if anyone becomes unwell with a new continuous cough or a high temperature, they should be sent home, to their room or the place they are staying. If they have to use public transport, they should try to keep away from other people and catch coughs and sneezes in a tissue

objects and surfaces that are touched regularly should be frequently cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products

The advice for these settings continues to be not to close unless advised to do so by the local Public Health England Health Protection Team or the government.

It comes after the Health and Social Care Secretary announced an expanded public awareness campaign asking people to self-isolate for 7 days if they develop a high temperature or a new continuous cough, however mild.

The most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves remains washing hands more often, for at least 20 seconds, with soap and water.

The next phase of the awareness campaign reiterates the importance of seeking help online by visiting NHS.UK/coronavirus to check symptoms and follow the medical advice, rather than visiting a GP.

Out of Containment and into Delay 12/03/2020

The Government has announced that we are moving out of the contain phase and into delay, in response to the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

The UK Chief Medical Officers have now raised the risk to the UK from moderate to high.

As per the current advice, the most important thing individuals can do to protect themselves remains washing their hands more often, for at least 20 seconds, with soap and water. Make sure you cough or sneeze into a tissue, put it in a bin and wash your hands.

We are asking anyone who shows certain symptoms to self-isolate for 7 days, regardless of whether they have travelled to affected areas. This means we want people to stay at home and avoid all but essential contact with others for 7 days from the point of displaying mild symptoms, to slow the spread of infection.

The symptoms are: * A high temperature (37.8 degrees and above) * A new, continuous cough

You do not need to call NHS 111 to go into self-isolation. If your symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better after 7 days contact NHS 111 online at 111.nhs.uk. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

In the coming weeks, we will be introducing further social distancing measures for older and vulnerable people, asking them to self-isolate regardless of symptoms.

If we introduce this next stage too early, the measures will not protect us at the time of greatest risk but could have a huge social impact. We need to time this properly, continue to do the right thing at the right time, so we get the maximum effect for delaying the virus. We will clearly announce when we ask the public to move to this next stage.

Our decisions are based on careful modelling.

We will only introduce measures that are supported by clinical and scientific evidence.

Number of cases

Now you can track the increase per day and the county by county spread every day by clicking here


New Measures and a move to DELAY

All school trips cancelled, elderly advised against cruises,

What to do if you have symptoms


Stay at home for 7 days if you have either:

  • a high temperature
  • a new continuous cough

This will help to protect others in your community while you are infectious.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

You do not need to contact NHS 111 to tell them you’re staying at home.

We will not be testing people who are self-isolating with mild symptoms.

Its loooking bleek for large gatherings: football season might be suspended

As providers of health care in a primary setting can we really risk healthcare conferences over the nest 6 months+?

Diagnosis and analysis

The UK is one of the first countries outside China to have a prototype specific laboratory test for this new disease. Healthcare professionals who are contacted by a patient with symptoms following travel to an affected area have been advised to submit samples to PHE for testing. Individuals should be treated in isolation.

After the experience of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, PHE developed a series of diagnostic tests to detect any member of the family of coronaviruses. These have been used for several years, and were able to detect the first UK case of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) in 2012.

With the first reported publication of the genome sequence of a 2019 novel coronavirus, PHE was able to rapidly develop further specific tests for this virus, working with WHO and global network of laboratories.

When a clinician suspects novel coronavirus (COVID-19), they take samples from the nose, throat and deeper respiratory samples, package and send them safely to PHE Colindale. PHE can provide a laboratory result from this specific virus on the same working day.

PHE also has the capability to sequence the viral genome and compare this to published sequences from China, if a case occurs. This will provide valuable information on any mutations in the virus over time and allow an improved understanding of how it spreads.

Latest Daily Reports on spread

Now you can track the increase per day and the county by county spread every day by

clicking here

Dateline 9th April 2020

Awaitung full Stats 17.40pm


Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily n/a n/a n/a 881
Total n/a n/a n/a 7,978

Dateline 8th April 2020

As of 9am on 8 April, 282,074 tests have concluded across the UK, with 14,682 tests carried out on 7 April. Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

232,708 people have been tested, of whom 60,773 tested positive. Today’s figure for test data does not include Charing Cross and Southampton due to a data processing delay. The tests concluded figure excludes data from Northern Ireland.

As of 5pm on 7 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 7,097 have died. Increase of 938 from yesterday.

 

Tests People tested Positive Deaths
Daily 14,682 12,959 5,492 938
Total 282,074 232,708 60,733 7,097

Dateline 7th April 2020

As of 9am on 7 April, 266,694 tests have concluded across the UK, with 14,006 tests carried out on 6 April. Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

213,181 people have been tested, of whom 55,242 tested positive. Today’s figure for people tested does not include Manchester and Leeds due to a data processing delay. The tests concluded figure excludes data from Northern Ireland.

As of 5pm on 6 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 6,159 have died.Increase of 786 from yesterday.

Dateline 6th April 2020

As of 9am 6 April, 252,958 tests have concluded, with 13,069 tests carried out on 5 April (this does not include data for Northern Ireland). Some individuals are tested more than once for clinical reasons.

208,837 people have been tested, of whom 51,608 tested positive.

As of 5pm on 5 April, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 5,373 have died. Increase of 439 from yesterday.

Dateline 5th April 2020

As of 9am on 5 April 2020, 195,524 people have been tested, of which 47,806 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 4 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 4,934 have died. Increase of 621 from yesterday.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily at 2pm or shortly after. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 4th April 2020

As of 9am on 4 April 2020, 183,190 people have been tested, of which 41,903 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 3 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 4,313 have died.Increase of 708 from yesterday.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily at 2pm or shortly after. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 3rd April 2020

As of 9am on 3 April 2020, 173,784 people have been tested, of which 38,168 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 2 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 3,605 have died. Increase of 684 from yesterday.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily at 2pm or shortly after. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 2nd April 2020
As of 9am on 2 April 2020, 163,194 people have been tested, of which 33,718 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 1 April 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 2,921 have died.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 1st April 2020

As of 9am on 1 April 2020, 152,979 people have been tested, of which 29,474 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 31 March 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus, 2,352 have died.

Data on UK positive and negative tests and data on deaths is updated on this page daily. The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 31st March 2020

As of 9am on 31 March 2020, a total of 143,186 people have been tested, of which 25,150 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 30 March 2020, of those hospitalised in the UK, 1,789 have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.


Dateline 30th March 2020

As of 9am on 30 March 2020, a total of 134,946 people have been tested, of which 112,805 were confirmed negative and 22,141 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 29 March 2020, 1,408 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 29th March 2020

As of 9am on 29 March 2020, a total of 127,737 people have been tested, of which 108,215 were confirmed negative and 19,522 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 28 March 2020, 1,228 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.


Dateline 28th March 2020

As of 9am on 28 March 2020, a total of 120,776 people have been tested, of which 103,687 were confirmed negative and 17,089 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 27 March 2020, 1,019 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 27th March 2020

As of 9am on 27 March 2020, a total of 113,777 people have been tested, of which 99,234 were confirmed negative and 14,543 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 26 March 2020, 759 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

The figures for test results and for deaths are compiled from different sources. This is why the figures for deaths are reported from an earlier point in time than the figures for test results.

Dateline 26th March 2020

As of 9am on 26 March 2020, a total of 104,866 people have been tested, of which 93,208 were confirmed negative and 11,658 were confirmed positive.

As of 5pm on 25 March 2020, 578 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 25th March 2020

As of 9am on 25 March 2020, a total of 97,019 people have been tested, of which 87,490 were confirmed negative and 9,529 were confirmed positive. 463 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 24th March 2020

As of 9am on 24 March 2020, a total of 90,436 people have been tested, of which 82,359 were confirmed negative and 8,077 were confirmed positive. 422 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 23rd March 2020


As of 9am on 23 March 2020, a total of 83,945 people have been tested, of which 77,295 were confirmed negative and 6,650 were confirmed positive.

As of 1pm on 23 March 2020, 335 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 21st March 2020

As of 9am on 21 March 2020, 72,818 people have been tested in the UK, of which 67,800 were confirmed negative and 5,018 were confirmed positive.

As of 9am, 233 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 20th March 2020

As of 9am on 20 March 2020, 66,976 people have been tested in the UK, of which 62,993 were confirmed negative and 3,983 were confirmed positive.

As of 1pm, 177 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 19th March 2020

As of 9am on 19 March 2020, 64,621 people have been tested in the UK, of which 61,352 were confirmed negative and 3,269 were confirmed positive. As of 1pm 144 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 18th March 2020

As of 9am on 18 March 2020, 56,221 people have been tested in the UK, of which 53,595 were confirmed negative and 2,626 were confirmed positive. 103 patients in the UK who tested positive for coronavirus (COVID-19) have died.

Dateline 17th March

As of 9am on 17 March 2020, 50,442 people have been tested in the UK, of which 48,492 were confirmed negative and 1,950 were confirmed as positive. The latest confirmed number of deaths will be announced later today.

Reports are sporadic dependent on change but we missed yesterday as our IT suffered a glitch apologies.

 

Dateline 14.03.20

As of 9am on 14 March 2020, 37,746 people have been tested in the UK, of which 36,606 were confirmed negative and 1,140 were confirmed as positive. 21 patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

Dateline 13.03.20

As of 9am on 13 March 2020, 32,771 people have been tested in the UK, of which 31,973 were confirmed negative and 798 were confirmed as positive. 10 patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

Cases identified in England

Confirmed cases in each local authority and NHS region are published by Public Health England (PHE).

Risk level

The risk to the UK has been raised to high.

 

 

 

Dateline 12.03.20

As of 9am on 12 March 2020, 29,764 people have been tested in the UK, of which 29,174 were confirmed negative and 590 were confirmed as positive. Eight patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

Cases in England

NHS region Cases


East of England 32
London 136
Midlands 44
North East and Yorkshire 44
North West 53
South East 83
South West 42
To be determined 57
Total 491

Confirmed cases in each local authority and NHS region are published by Public Health England (PHE).

Dateline 11.03.20

As of 9am on 11 March 2020, 27,476 people have been tested in the UK, of which 27,020 were confirmed negative and 456 were confirmed as positive.

Six patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

NHS region Cases Breakdown

East of England 32
London 104
Midlands 42
North East and Yorkshire 32
North West 43
South East 60
South West 44
To be determined 30

Total 387

Dateline 10.03.20

Number of cases
As of 9am on 10 March 2020, 26,261 people have been tested in the UK, of which 25,888 were confirmed negative and 373 were confirmed as positive.

Six patients who tested positive for COVID-19 have died.

NHS region: Cases: Last Breakdown

East of England 29
London 91
Midlands 36
North East and Yorkshire 24
North West 37
South East 51
South West 41
To be determined 15
Total 324

Dateline 09.03.20

As of 9am this morning just under 300 cases in the UK have tested positive for COVID-19.

23000 people have been tested, with 280 testing positive and 3 dying.

Government decided to remain at "Containment Phase"

NHS region Cases

East of England 24

London 61

Midlands 31

North East and Yorkshire 22

North West 35

South East 43

South West 38

To be determined 26

Total 280

Dateline 05.03.20

As of 9am this morning 25 further patients in England have tested positive for COVID-19.

Seventeen were diagnosed who had recently travelled from recognised countries or from recognised clusters which were under investigation. Eight patients were identified in the UK where it is not yet clear whether they contracted it directly or indirectly from an individual who had recently returned from abroad. This is being investigated and contact tracing has begun.

The total number of confirmed cases in England is now 105. Following previously reported confirmed cases in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland, the total number of UK cases is 115.

All 7 NHS England regions are now reporting on cases of COVID-19. From tomorrow, 6 March 2020, Public Health England will start reporting on upper-tier local authority cases.

Dateline 04.03.20

CMO for England announces 32 new cases of novel corona-virus: 4 March 2020
Chief Medical Officer (CMO) Professor Chris Whitty statement on 32 new cases of COVID-19.

Optrafair logo
Professor Chris Whitty, CMO for England, said:

As of 9am this morning 32 further patients in England have tested positive for COVID-19.

Twenty-nine patients were diagnosed who had recently travelled from recognised countries or from recognised clusters which were under investigation.

Three additional patients contracted the virus in the UK and it is not yet clear whether they contracted it directly or indirectly from an individual who had recently returned from abroad. This is being investigated and contact tracing has begun.


The total number of confirmed cases in England is now 80. Following previously reported confirmed cases in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland, the total number of UK cases is 85.

As of today, due to the number of new cases, we will no longer be publishing information on the location of each new case.

Instead, this information will be published in a consolidated format once a week. This will be published on Friday. Regions will continue to be told as and when they have confirmed cases.


Regulators of Health Providers define how Covid-19 will affect their role
What Travellers returning should do and how primary care facilities should deal with them
Possible contamination in practce, deep clean?


Covid -19 So what is it:


Coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new strain of coronavirus first identified in Wuhan City, China in December 2019.
Public Health England is working to contact anyone who has been in close contact with people who have coronavirus.


 

Regulators of Health Providers define how Covid-19 will affect their role

How we will continue to regulate in light of novel coronavirus (COVID-19)?


We understand that as health and care professionals you may be feeling anxious about novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Across the UK, public health organisations, government health officials and employers are putting in place plans to ensure that people receive the right advice, care and support and that you have the best information, environment and equipment to do your job.

Health and care professionals will play a vital role in helping to treat and contain coronavirus and we recognise that should the virus spread further, health and care professionals are likely to face an increased burden in helping the UK through the outbreak. It’s important that during this time everyone follows national public health advice and guidance.

We also recognise that health and care professionals may have understandable concerns about decisions they may need to take in order to provide the best care in challenging circumstances. Together, as professional regulators across the UK, we have prepared a joint statement on how we will carry out our roles during this time.

Joint statement from Chief Executives of statutory regulators of health and care professionals

We hold the registers of health and care professionals in the UK. We support those professionals to deliver better, safer care by setting the standards they need to meet, to act in the best interests of patients and people who use health and social care services at all times.

As registered professionals, the first concern of the individuals on our registers will be the care of their patients and people who use health and social care services. We encourage health and care professionals, working in partnership with each other and people using services, to use their professional judgement to assess risk to deliver safe care informed by any relevant guidance and the values and principles set out in their professional standards.

We recognise that in highly challenging circumstances, professionals may need to depart from established procedures in order to care for patients and people using health and social care services. Our regulatory standards are designed to be flexible and to provide a framework for decision-making in a wide range of situations. They support professionals by highlighting the key principles which should be followed, including the need to work cooperatively with colleagues to keep people safe, to practise in line with the best available evidence, to recognise and work within the limits of their competence, and to have appropriate indemnity arrangements relevant to their practice.

We recognise that the individuals on our registers may feel anxious about how context is taken into account when concerns are raised about their decisions and actions in very challenging circumstances. Where a concern is raised about a registered professional, it will always be considered on the specific facts of the case, taking into account the factors relevant to the environment in which the professional is working. We would also take account of any relevant information about resource, guidelines or protocols in place at the time.

We may issue profession specific guidance to registrants to provide additional support where that is needed.

The statutory health and care regulators that have agreed to this statement are:

General Chiropractic Council
General Dental Council
General Medical Council
General Optical Council
General Osteopathic Council
General Pharmaceutical Council
Health and Care Professions Council
Nursing and Midwifery Council
Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland
Scottish Social Services Council
Social Work England

Advice for returning travellers

March 9th

Returning travellers

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places in the last 14 days, even if you do not have symptoms:

Iran
Hubei province in China
lockdown areas in northern Italy:

Lombardy region (which includes the cities of Milan, Bergamo, Como) and the provinces of Modena, Parma, Piacenza, Reggio Emilia and Rimini (all in Emilia Romagna); Pesaro e Urbino (in Marche); Alessandria, Asti, Novara, Verbano-Cusio-Ossola and Vercelli (all in Piemonte); Padova. Treviso and Venice (in Veneto).

special care zones in South Korea
Daegu
Cheongdo

Stay indoors and avoid contact with other people if you’ve travelled to the UK from the following places in the last 14 days and have a cough, high temperature or shortness of breath, even if your symptoms are mild:

mainland China outside of Hubei province
Italy outside of the lockdown areas
South Korea outside of the special care zones
Cambodia
Hong Kong
Japan
Laos
Macau
Malaysia
Myanmar
Singapore
Taiwan
Thailand
Vietnam


Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do next.

Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital or primary care facilities including opticians and dentists.

In Scotland call your GP or NHS 24 on 111 out of hours.

In Wales call 111 (if available in your area) or 0845 46 47.

In Northern Ireland call 111.

 

Read the latest information about the situation in the UK, along with guidance for what to do if you think you’re at risk.


Go to NHSUK/coronavirus for information about the virus and how to protect yourself.

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to check if you need medical help.

The government has published its coronavirus action plan and expanded its public information campaign.

Read Public Health England’s blog posts about its response to coronavirus and how it uses contact tracing to prevent the spread of infection.

We remind all primary care practices of the Government's Interim Advice on dealing with Covid-19

1. Main principles

Identify potential cases as soon as possible

prevent potential transmission of infection to other patients and staff

avoid direct physical contact, including physical examination, and exposures to respiratory secretions

isolate the patient, obtain specialist advice and determine if the patient is at risk of COVID-19

Currently, if COVID-19 infection is seen in the UK, it is most likely to occur in travelers who have recently returned from specified countries and areas. Therefore, an accurate travel history is an important part of identifying potential risk. See Public Heath England’s (PHE’s) guidance for assessing possible cases.

2. Actions to take

Patients booking in by telephone or online who meet the case definition should be directed to NHS 111.

An unwell patient with a relevant travel history should be identified when they book in at reception and immediately placed in a room away from other patients and staff. If COVID-19 is considered possible when a consultation is already in progress, withdraw from the room, close the door and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.

Avoid physical examination of a suspected case.

The patient should remain in the room with the door closed. Belongings and waste should remain in the room. The patient and any accompanying family should remain in the room with the door closed.

Advise others not to enter the room.

If a clinical history still needs to be obtained or completed, do this by telephone.

If entry to the room or contact with the patient is unavoidable in an emergency, wear personal protective equipment (PPE) in line with standard infection control precautions, such as gloves, apron and fluid resistant surgical mask (FRSM) and keep exposure to a minimum. All PPE in full should be disposed of as clinical waste.

Should the patient need to use the toilet, they should be allocated a WC for their sole use. Instruct the patient to wash their hands thoroughly after toileting, and return directly to the room they have been isolated in and close the door. The toilet should be taken out of use until cleaned and disinfected following the decontamination guidance.

Ask the patient to call NHS 111 from their room, on their mobile (use GP surgery landline if mobile unavailable).

When a telephone interview is being conducted with a patient located elsewhere (for example at home) and it is determined that COVID-19 is possible (based on the PHE criteria for a possible case), then a face-to-face assessment in primary care (including out-of-hours centres and GP hubs) must be avoided. Instead, call the local secondary care infection specialist to discuss safe assessment, if hospital care is being considered, if not refer to NHS 111.

3. Patient transfers

If the patient is critically ill and requires an urgent ambulance transfer to a hospital, inform the ambulance call handler of the concerns about COVID-19.

In all other instances, the case must be discussed with the hospital first so that they are aware that COVID-19 is being considered and the method of transport to secondary care agreed.

Patients with suspected COVID-19 should be instructed not to use public transport or taxis to get to hospital.

Following the patient transfer, the room should be closed and should not be used until further advice is provided by the local HPT.

4. Environmental cleaning following a possible case

Once a possible case has been transferred from the primary care premises, the room where the patient was placed should not be used, the room door should remain shut, with windows opened and the air conditioning switched off, until it has been cleaned with detergent and disinfectant. Once this process has been completed, the room can be put back in use immediately.

4.1 Preparation

The responsible person undertaking the cleaning with detergent and disinfectant should be familiar with these processes and procedures:
collect all cleaning equipment and clinical waste bags before entering the room
any cloths and mop heads used must be disposed of as single use items
before entering the room, perform hand hygiene then put on a disposable plastic apron and gloves

4.2 On entering the room

Keep the door closed with windows open to improve airflow and ventilation whilst using detergent and disinfection products

Bag all items that have been used for the care of the patient as clinical waste, for example, contents of the waste bin and any consumables that cannot be cleaned with detergent and disinfectant
remove any fabric curtains or screens and bag as infectious linen

Close any sharps containers wiping the surfaces with either a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1000 parts per million (ppm) available chlorine (av.cl.) or a neutral purpose detergent followed by disinfection (1000 ppm av.cl.)

4.3 Cleaning process

Use disposable cloths or paper roll or disposable mop heads, to clean and disinfect all hard surfaces or floor or chairs or door handles or reusable non-invasive care equipment or sanitary fittings in the room, following one of the 2 options below:

use either a combined detergent disinfectant solution at a dilution of 1000 parts per million (ppm) available chlorine (av.cl.) or a neutral purpose detergent followed by disinfection (1000 ppm av.cl.)
follow manufacturer’s instructions for dilution, application and contact times for all detergents and disinfectants

Any cloths and mop heads used must be disposed of as single use items

4.4 Cleaning and disinfection of reusable equipment

clean and disinfect any reusable non-invasive care equipment, such as blood pressure monitors, digital thermometers, glucometers, that are in the room prior to their removal
clean all reusable equipment systematically from the top or furthest away point

4.5 Carpeted flooring and soft furnishings

If carpeted floors or item cannot withstand chlorine-releasing agents, consult the manufacturer’s instructions for a suitable alternative to use, following or combined with detergent cleaning.

4.6 On leaving the room

discard detergent or disinfectant solutions safely at disposal point
all waste from suspected contaminated areas should be removed from the room and quarantined until patient test results are known (this may take 48 hours); if the patient is confirmed to have COVID-19 further advice should be sought from the local HPT

Clean, dry and store re-usable parts of cleaning equipment, such as mop handles remove and discard PPE as clinical waste perform hand hygiene

4.7 Cleaning of communal areas

If a suspected case spent time in a communal area, for example, a waiting area or toilet facilities, then these areas should be cleaned with detergent and disinfectant (as above) as soon as practicably possible, unless there has been a blood or body fluid spill which should be dealt with immediately. Once cleaning and disinfection have been completed, the area can be put back in use.

You can download the full pdf here for primary care optical practices

 


 
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